lectures

Tutankhamun's Mask Reconsidered
Tutankhamun's gold mask is one of the ancient world's most spectacular artworks, yet more than 80 years after its discovery the piece remains essentially unstudied. This paper draws together what we currently know about the object, focusing particularly ...

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The Amarna Dead in the Valley of the Kings (version 2)
The Valley of the Kings, situated in the Theban desert some 350 miles south of modern Cairo, is perhaps the most famous cemetery in the world. Once, more than three thousand years ago, its cliffs contained the greatest concentration of bullion-rich burials ...

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Who Was Akhenaten?
When Napoleon Bonaparte’s company of soldiers and savants stumbled upon the ruins of el-Amarna in 1798-99, the modern world knew nothing of Amenhotep IV-Akhenaten, this city’s former king. Fifty years on, following the decipherment of Egypt’s mysterious ...

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The Amarna Royal Tombs Project: Four Years' Work, 1998-2002
The Amarna Royal Tombs Project first started digging in the central part of the Valley of the Kings in 1998, in search of fresh evidence of Amarna-period activity in the area. It’s been a busy five years since, and in this lecture I should like to outline ...

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Akhenaten and the Amarna Pharaohs
In the north of Egypt, around 1370 BC, a child was born to the Egyptian queen Tiye, great royal wife of the powerful pharaoh Amenophis III.

A second son, the child was named after the divinity he would later come to revile: Amenophis, ‘The god ...

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The Amarna Royal Tombs Project: Prospects for the Future
To sum up briefly the theory of why we’re digging in the Valley of the Kings, and the work of the past three seasons.

Our belief is:

- that Tutankhamun’s reuse of earlier funerary furniture was far greater in extent than previously suspected, ...

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Re-excavating ‘The Gold Tomb’
Bordering the Amarna Royal Tombs Project's original site on the west, with its entrance shaft located just across the path from the tomb of Ramesses III, lies an undecorated tomb, KV 56, first discovered by Edward Ayrton, Davis’s excavator, on 5 January ...

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The Amarna Dead in the Valley of the Kings (version 1)
The Valley of the Kings, situated in the Theban desert cliffs some 350 miles south of modern Cairo, is perhaps the most famous cemetery site in the world--and rightly so. Once, more than three thousand years ago, its desert cliffs contained the greatest ...

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The Amarna Royal Tombs Project: Prospects for 2002
I'd like to speak briefly today on the work of the Amarna Royal Tombs Project in the Valley of the Kings, but before I describe what we're doing it will perhaps be helpful to outline just why we're doing it. The story goes back to the summer ...

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The Collector’s Art: Ancient Egypt at Eton College
Eton College, despite its name, is not an English university but a school—for boys, aged between 13 and 18 years. Founded by Royal Charter of king Henry VI on 11 October 1440, its more formal name is “The king’s college of our lady of Eton, beside Windsor”. ...

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